December 7, 1941


It is just after 1:00 in the morning here where I am, and I have taken a break from crocheting scarves, while watching sappy Hallmark Christmas shows, and I have taken noticed of today’s date, a day that will truly go down as a “day of infamy” in America. Pearl Harbor was attacked, and World War II began. Among the losses that day was a ship called the Arizona which went down with many men lost. There were men of many ages, but let us think about those men with an average age of 20, born in 1921. And Doris Miller, a young black man who was not allowed to be a fighter, but who shot down a couple of planes that day. He didn’t die that day, but he did a year or two later.

What did those men miss in the 73 years since that happened?

Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, LBJ, Nixon, Clinton, both Bushes, Barak Obama. They missed out on the Atom Bomb; Hitler’s horrors; the Sullivan Brothers; the rise of the military/industrial complex; GI college classes; Korea; television; big-finned cars; big skirts with lots of petticoats; button-down collars; rock and roll; the Cold War and the stand-downs in Cuba; the Iron Curtain and the Berlin Wall; a presidential assassination; the rise of free love, drugs, 60s music; Vietnam; Civil Rights; Tom Hanks and Marilyn Monroe; computers; 8-track music; cassettes; CDs and videos; DVDs; the space program, landing on the moon; space shuttles, MIR, and the space station; disco; heavy metal and grunge music; the Me generation; the rise of pornography; kitten pictures on social networks; the Internet and social networks; phones one can carry around that take pictures; the rise of Israel and all the problems that came with that; wars and more wars; the rise of terrorism all over the world; drugs and more drugs; hatred against immigrants; starvation and filth and homelessness; anger over religious conflict; intolerance; jet planes and drones and RPGs, both as games for TVs and as weapons; the trashing of our planet and climate change for the worst; and hatred, hatred, hatred.

The united States that so many of those 20 year olds would have gladly fought for after that day are so un-united now that one wonders; were they the lucky ones? The ones who did not live to see what has become of this country and this world that they might have fought for had they not died the first day?

I wonder what happened to that world that we lost on December 7, 1941. Well, we were headed in the right direction for a while, a very little while, when everyone who was alive then was willing to sacrifice for the horrors of the 1940s, but started losing their way by the mid-1960s.

Those 20 year olds of that day would be in their 90s today. What would they think of the world they were gung-ho for on that day think if they came back today? There were some good times, and up times, some prosperous times; but as I write this list, I realize there were many more bad times, and things are falling apart today, everywhere.

I’m not sure they weren’t the lucky ones.

In a very pensive mood. I am

Carol Stepp
Austin, TX

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About carolstepp

Music is about the most important thing in my life, and I follow a large number of musicians, particularly Irish, Scots, Classical, Crossovers of any of these. I was writing a blog about Celtic Thunder regularly on MySpace, and now I have left them after a year, and will start writing my blogs here. I am 70, retired, living on Social Security, and have a lot of social network fans.
This entry was posted in Equality, Foreign Affairs, Homelessness, Medicine, Mental health, Other media, personal thoughts, Politics, Religious, Voting Rights. Bookmark the permalink.

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